Mon. May 27th, 2019

YO9ILX HamRadio

Expect the Unexpected…

Q Code

5 min read
CodeQuestionAnswer or Statement
QLEWhat is your expected signal?The expected signal is low…
QNIMay I join the net?You may check in…
QRAWhat is the name (or call sign) of your station?The name (or call sign) of my station is …
QRGWill you tell me my exact frequency (or that of …)?Your exact frequency (or that of … ) is … kHz (or MHz).
QRHDoes my frequency vary?Your frequency varies.
QRIHow is the tone of my transmission?The tone of your transmission is (1. Good; 2. Variable; 3. Bad)
QRJHow many voice contacts do you want to make?I want to make … voice contacts.
QRKWhat is the readability of my signals (or those of …)?The readability of your signals (or those of …) is … (1 to 5).
QRLAre you busy?I am busy. (or I am busy with … ) Please do not interfere.
QRMDo you have interference? [from other stations]I have interference.
QRNAre you troubled by static?I am troubled by static.
QROShall I increase power?Increase power.
QRPShall I decrease power?Decrease power.
QRQShall I send faster?Send faster (… wpm)
QRSShall I send more slowly?Send more slowly (… wpm)
QRTShall I cease or suspend operation?/ shutoff the radioI am suspending operation. /shutting off the radio
QRUHave you anything for me?I have nothing for you.
QRVAre you ready?I am ready.
QRWShall I inform … that you are calling him on … kHz (or MHz)?Please inform … that I am calling him on … kHz (or MHz).
QRXShall I standby / When will you call me again?Please standby / I will call you again at … (hours) on … kHz (or MHz)
QRZWho is calling me?You are being called by … on … kHz (or MHz)
QSAWhat is the strength of my signals (or those of … )?The strength of your signals (or those of …) is … (1 to 5).
QSBAre my signals fading?Your signals are fading.
QSDIs my keying defective?Your keying is defective.
QSGShall I send … telegrams (messages) at a time?Send … telegrams (messages) at a time.
QSKCan you hear me between your signals?I can hear you between my signals.
QSLCan you acknowledge receipt?I am acknowledging receipt.
QSMShall I repeat the last telegram (message) which I sent you, or some previous telegram (message)?Repeat the last telegram (message) which you sent me (or telegram(s) (message(s)) numbers(s) …).
QSNDid you hear me (or … (call sign)) on .. kHz (or MHz)?I did hear you (or … (call sign)) on … kHz (or MHz).
QSOCan you communicate with … direct or by relay?I can communicate with … direct (or by relay through …).
QSPWill you relay a message to …?I will relay a message to … .
QSRDo you want me to repeat my call?Please repeat your call; I did not hear you.
QSSWhat working frequency will you use?I will use the working frequency … kHz (or MHz).
QSTHere is a broadcast message to all amateurs.
QSUShall I send or reply on this frequency (or on … kHz (or MHz))?Send or reply on this frequency (or on … kHz (or MHz)).
QSWWill you send on this frequency (or on … kHz (or MHz))?I am going to send on this frequency (or on … kHz (or MHz)).
QSXWill you listen to … (call sign(s) on … kHz (or MHz))?I am listening to … (call sign(s) on … kHz (or MHz))
QSYShall I change to transmission on another frequency?Change to transmission on another frequency (or on … kHz (or MHz)).
QSZShall I send each word or group more than once?Send each word or group twice (or … times).
QTAShall I cancel telegram (message) No. … as if it had not been sent?Cancel telegram (message) No. … as if it had not been sent.
QTCHow many telegrams (messages) have you to send?I have … telegrams (messages) for you (or for …).
QTHWhat is your position in latitude and longitude (or according to any other indication)?My position is … latitude…longitude
QTRWhat is the correct time?The correct time is … hours
QTUAt what times are you operating?I am operating from … to … hours.
QTXWill you keep your station open for further communication with me until further notice (or until … hours)?I will keep my station open for further communication with you until further notice (or until … hours).
QUAHave you news of … (call sign)?Here is news of … (call sign).
QUCWhat is the number (or other indication) of the last message you received from me (or from … (call sign))?The number (or other indication) of the last message I received from you (or from … (call sign)) is …
QUDHave you received the urgency signal sent by … (call sign of mobile station)?I have received the urgency signal sent by … (call sign of mobile station) at … hours.
QUECan you speak in … (language), – with interpreter if necessary; if so, on what frequencies?I can speak in … (language) on … kHz (or MHz).
QUFHave you received the distress signal sent by … (call sign of mobile station)?I have received the distress signal sent by … (call sign of mobile station) at … hours.

Notes for response to radiotelegraph Q-codes: Responses to a radiotelegraph Q-code query or a Q-code assertion may vary depending upon the code. For Q-code assertions or queries which only need to be acknowledged as received, the usual practice is to respond with the letter “R” for “Roger” which means “Received correctly”. Sending an “R” merely means the code has been correctly received and does not necessarily mean that the receiving operator has taken any other action. For Q-code queries that need to be answered in the affirmative, the usual practice is to respond with the letter “C” (Sounds like the Spanish word “Si”). For Q-code queries that need to be answered in the negative, the usual practice it to respond with the letter “N” for “no”. For those Q-code assertions that merely need to be acknowledged as understood, the usual practice is to respond with the prosign SN or VE which means “understood”. On telegraph cable networks “KK” was often used at the end of a reply to a Q Code to mean “OK” or “Acknowledged”. This practice predates amateur radio as telegraph operators in the late 19th Century are known to have used it.

Informal usage[edit]

Chart of the Morse code letters and numerals.[14]

QLF – “Are you sending with your left foot? Try sending with your left foot!” A humorously derogatory comment about the quality of a person’s sending. [15][16]

QSK – “I can hear you during my transmission” – refers to a particular mode of Morse code operating often called QSK operation (full break-in) in which the receiver is quickly enabled during the spaces between the dits and dahs, which allows another operator to interrupt transmissions. Many modern transceivers incorporate this function, sometimes referred to as full break-in as against semi-break-in in which there is a short delay before the transceiver goes to receive.[17]

QSY – “Change to transmission on another frequency”; colloquially, “move [=change address]”. E.g., “When did GKB QSY from Northolt to Portishead….?”[18]

QTH – “My location is…”; colloquially in voice or writing, “location”. E.g., “The OCF [antenna] is an interesting build but at my QTH a disappointing performer.”[19]

QTHR – “At the registered location…”; Chiefly British in voice or writing, “Historically – the location in the printed Callbook. Modernly – as given in online government records for my callsign”. E.g., “You can contact me QTHR”[20]

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